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Poster: Ganbachi Date: Jul 30, 2009 7:27am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (Basics of U.S. GATT copyright law)

"Broadcasts made prior to 1 January 1969 are not protected under Austrlian copyright law."???

Does that mean we could have "The Interpretaris", "Vega 4" and "The Stranger" - all of which were made for TV and broadcast before 1969 - over in classic tv? (I love Aussie TV, we had so much of it imported to the UK over the years).

Sorry for my ignorant queries, I'm trying to get my brain round copyright laws but when I think I've got it I find out I'm all wrong.

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Poster: Administrator, Curator, or StaffVideo-Cellar Date: Jul 30, 2009 8:18am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (Basics of U.S. GATT copyright law)

Broadcast copyright in Australia refers to the encoded Broadcast signal. The underlying works contained in the broadcast (moving images, dramatic scripts, music) are protected by seperate copyrights. News and factual programs are protected for at least 50 years and most dramatic programs are copyright for at least 70 years from the date of first airing. So old doco shows like "A Year To Remember", news shows, some variety shows and Cinesound/Movietone Specials are steadily entering the public domain while the great drama, mystery and kids shows etc will take a litle longer.
It is similar to a copyright in a book edition. The edition copyright covers the typeface and page arrangement but the underlying written work may be subject to its own literary copyright. Its kind of like copyright on the box being seperate to the copyright on whats in the box.

This post was modified by Video-Cellar on 2009-07-30 15:18:18

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Poster: Ganbachi Date: Jul 31, 2009 1:17pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (Basics of U.S. GATT copyright law)

OK. Video-cellar, I got one more question, it's a long shot but:

My wife bought me some cheap dvd's of 2 recent-ish US TV shows. Out of curiosity I looked them up and found no copyright registration. On the episode end credits one of them says "All rights reserved, 1996" and the other says "Copyright 1996" but neither of them have the copyright sign.

This wouldn't make them PD would it?

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Poster: Fact_Checker Date: Aug 4, 2009 6:11am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (1996 TV show without copyright notice)

Copyright notices had recently become optional in 1996. The notice that you described would not put it into the public domain. However, had the show been made and "published" decades earlier, that would be a different story.

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Poster: Fact_Checker Date: Aug 4, 2009 6:36am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (1996 TV show without copyright notice)

If Ganbachi or anyone else would like to check out the law that changed the copyright notice requirements, go to http://law.copyrightdata.com/amendments.php, and select:

"Public Law 100-568 (October 31, 1988)"

Use the button to bring up the full text. The relevant part is section 7.

If you want an easy declaration from the Copyright Office, check out Circular 3: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ03.pdf

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Poster: Ganbachi Date: Aug 4, 2009 7:10am
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Question (1996 TV show without copyright notice)

Thank you, Fact-Checker. Your input in these forums has been invaluable (to me, at least).